Print Page | Contact Us | Report Abuse | Sign In | Register
Historical Book Reviews
Group HomeGroup Home Blog Home Group Blogs

BOOK REVIEW: Rebel Brass: The Confederate Command System

Posted By Russ Lockwood, Monday, August 12, 2019

BOOK REVIEW: Rebel Brass: The Confederate Command System

by Frank E. Vandiver.

A small, short, 126-page book from LSU Press in 1952 read like a stream of consciousness than scholarly tome. It offered an overview of the upper echelons of the CSA executive branch, from President Jefferson Davis through the multiple secretaries of Army and Navy, army commanders, and a few other key men, and their often tumultuous interactions with each other. Occasional bright spots of leadership, but it's a wonder anything got done -- and was often done ineptly.

Not a detailed look, but enjoyed the broad overview.

Tags:  American Civil War 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

BOOK REVIEW: Mapping the Civil War: Featuring Rare Maps from the Library of Congress

Posted By Russ Lockwood, Monday, August 5, 2019

BOOK REVIEW: Mapping the Civil War: Featuring Rare Maps from the Library of Congress

by Christopher Nelson

The 12 chapters offered a quick overview of American Civil War campaigns and battles interspersed with photos and maps. The maps are the superstars of the book, and while quite a good selection, they need to be larger. This really needs to be one of those big folio-sized books.

Tags:  American Civil War 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

BOOK REVIEW: Dixie Betrayed: How the South Really Lost the War

Posted By Russ Lockwood, Friday, June 28, 2019

BOOK REVIEW: Dixie Betrayed: How the South Really Lost the War

by David J Eicher.

For a book that purports to explain the Southern loss of the ACW, it contains plenty of well-researched leader profiles and the backstabbing among them, but remarkably little analysis. Horne's How Far From Austerlitz? is a better role-model for the sort of analytical work Dixie Betrayed could have been.

Nonetheless, make your own conclusions as you watch the disintegration of unity of purpose as the war drags on -- governors pled self-defense and refused to provide troops, politics centered on rivalries, and Jefferson Davis presided over a system prided on individuality instead of common struggle. The less you know about the internal political workings of the CSA, the more you'll appreciate the book.

Enjoyed it, if only to discover that CSA VP Stephens spent a couple days in July 1863 in Washington DC trying to secure a prisoner exchange as a way of opening peace talks (p191).

Tags:  American Civil War 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Fall In! Toys for Tots Sponsors